Weekly Mass Schedule For the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church
Please go to "Mass Location" tab on top of the page for details for the Mass Schedule for each Mission, for the current month.

SATURDAY: January 15th - St Paul, First Hermit, C (d)
† Matthew James Vigil............................................................................ 9:00 a.m. Mass
SUNDAY - January 16th - 2nd Sunday after Epiphany (sd)
† Matthew James Vigil ........................................................................... 7:00 a.m. Mass
Aiden Lightner......................................................................................... 9:00 a.m. Mass
SUNDAY - January 16th - 2nd Sunday after Epiphany (sd)
† Matthew James Vigil 7:00 a.m. Mass
Aiden Lightner 9:00 a.m. Mass
MONDAY: January 17th - St Anthony, Ab (d)
† Matthew James Vigil ........................................................................... No Scheduled Mass
TUESDAY: January 18th - St Peter’s Chair at Rome (dm)
† Matthew James Vigil ........................................................................... No Scheduled Mass
WEDNESDAY: January 19th - St. Marius & Comp. Mm (sp)
† Matthew James Vigil ........................................................................... 8:00 a.m. Mass
THURSDAY: January 20th - Sts. Fabian, P & Sebastian, Mm (d)
† Matthew James Vigil ........................................................................... 8:00 a.m. Mass
FRIDAY: January 21st - St. Agnes, VM (d)
† Matthew James Vigil ........................................................................... 8:00 a.m. Mass
SATURDAY: January 22nd - Sts. Vincent & Anastasius, Mm (sd)
† Matthew James Vigil ........................................................................... 9:00 a.m. Mass
SUNDAY - January 23rd - 3rd Sunday after Epiphany (sd)
† Matthew James Vigil ........................................................................... 7:00 a.m. Mass
Brennan Lightner ................................................................................. 9:00 a.m. Mass

 

Sanctuary Lamp this week is burning for the repose of the soul of Fr Roy Randolph.

                    Confession Schedule
Saturday — 8:30 a.m. - 8:55 a.m.
Sunday   — 6:30 a.m. - 6:55 a.m.
               — 8:10 a.m. - 8:55 a.m..

                  Altar Boy Serving Schedule
Jan 16 — 1st Mass: Stephen Rollins
                2nd Mass: Killian Skierka & Blane Lightner
Jan 23 — 1st Mass: Nathan Rollins
                2nd Mass: Francis Caggeso & Peter Skierka
Jan 30 — 1st Mass: Blaise Skierka
                2nd Mass: Brennan Skierka & Gabriel Lightner

                  Rosary Leader
Jan 16 — 1st Mass: Tim Riley — 2nd Mass: Cole Lowder
Jan 23 — 1st Mass: Brian Drewes — 2nd Mass: Cole Lowder
Jan 30 —1st Mass: Tim Riley — 2nd Mass: Cole Lowderr

                 Church Cleaning Schedule
Jan 16 — Amy Lightner, Daneal Lightner, Allie Quincer
Jan 23 — Penny Shevlin
Jan 30 — Church cleaning and taking down decorations, volunteers needed

              Treat Schedule
Jan 16 —Sarah Rollins, Jennifer Springer, Jeanette Kalafat
Jan 23 —Lisa Skierka, Lauren Caggeso, Jordee Bomgardner
Jan 30 —Rebecca Lightner, Monica Whall, Katie Riley

             Snow Removal
Jan 16 — Cole Lowder — Matthew Kleski
Jan 23 — Paul Skierka — Joseph Farrenkopf
Jan 30 — Kevin Rollins — Nathan Rollins
Feb 6 — Pat Bogner — Dominic Bogner

Please go to "Mass Location" tab on top of the page for details for each Mission, for the month.

             Announcements.

Parishioner Registration update: Those who have not filled out the IHM Church registration card last year, and those who have had circumstances change (recently married, turned 21, moved to new residence, etc), please help me update our records.
 

Fr. Jenkins online instructions: wcbohio.blogspot.comv

Can Our Priests Forgive Sins?
By the Rev. John A. O'Brien, Ph. D.,

“Can you pardon a criminal from the state penitentiary at Joliet just the same as Governor Emerson of Illinois?” I asked. “No,” replied my friend, I’ll admit I can’t do that.” “But aren’t you a man,” I per-sisted, “and isn’t Mr. Emerson a man, the same as you? And didn’t you say that you had as much power to forgive a misdeed as any other man?” “Yes,” replied my friend, “but I make a distinction. Mr. Emerson simply as a man does not have the power to pardon. It is only because he occupies the office of the Governor of Illinois that he has such authority.”
“Then you admit,” I pointed out, “the same basic distinction which the Church makes, between a priest simply as a human being, and as one who exercises the office of an ambassador of Christ, and exercises power solely by virtue of the office which he holds. I in my private personal capacity as Mr. Smith or Mr. Jones, have no more power than you or any other man. But I, in my official capacity as an ambassador of Almighty God, acting in His name and by His authority, exercise a power which far transcends that of a human being and is, in truth, the very power of God Himself.
An Analogy
This distinction between a man in his private capacity, simply as a human being, and in his official position as an ambas-sador, is woven into the very warp and woof of our American government. Thus, Mr. Andrew W. Mellon is sent as the am-bassador of the United States to the court of St. James in London. When he acts within the limits of his duly accredited jurisdiction as our ambassador, and signs documents affecting the relations of England and the United States, is there behind his signature the feeble strength of but one elderly man? On the contrary, there is behind his sig-nature the power and the strength, and the sovereign authority of 125 millions of citizens of our country. Why? Because he acts as our ambassador, in our name and by our authority.
It is this very distinction that the Apostle St. Paul pointed out in his epistle to the Corinthians when he explained to them the beneficent arrangement of Divine Provi-dence for the reconciliation of sinners. “God,” he says, “hath reconciled us to Himself through Christ, and hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation. . . . For Christ, therefore, we are ambassadors: God, as it were exhorting through us.” (II Cor. 5:18-20)
St. Paul publicly proclaimed his unwor-thiness and frailty. He had persecuted the Church of God, and there was given to him a “sting of the flesh, an angel of Satan” to buffet him. Yet he recognized that Christ chose not angels, but weak and sinful men to be his ministers. Every priest receives his priestly power from a bishop, who traces his power back through an unbroken succession of bishops to one of the Apostles, and back ultimately to Christ Himself. That is why a priest as a duly accredited ambassador of God exercises the tremendous power of forgiving sin, a power that comes from God as its ultimate Source.
A General Policy
In delegating priests to act as ministers of reconciliation, Christ is but following the general policy, so clearly recorded in the Gospels, of using men as His ambas-sadors to administer all the sacraments and to preach and to teach in His name. Thus He commissioned the Apostles to teach in His name, saying: “Go ye, therefore, and teach all nations,” Similar was His com-mission to them to baptize: “Teach ye all nations; baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.” (Matt. 28:19)
Is it not passing strange that Christians who frankly admit that Christ chose men to be the heralds of His Gospel and the ministers of baptism and the other sacra-ments should yet seek to exclude from them the one sacrament of reconciliation? Surely the fair minded reader must see that in so doing they are going directly against the plain teaching not only of St. Paul but of Jesus Christ Himself.
Another difficulty experienced by many non-Catholic, arises from their custom of confessing their sins to God privately, and from their belief that such a confession is sufficient to secure forgiveness.

 

Mission Mass Information

Great Falls: (Black Eagle - Immaculate Heart of Mary)
Mass every Sunday, 7:00 & 9:00 a.m.: Holy Days, 9:00 a.m

Helena: (Holy Cross) 

Mass every Sunday and Holy Days:
1:00 p.m. See Church Bulletin

Missoula: (East Missoula - Holy Shroud) 

Mass 2nd & 4th Sundays of the month and Holy Days
5:00 p.m.

Billings: (Pompeys Pillar - St. Martin de Tours) 

Mass 1st, 3rd Sundays of the month and Holy Days
3:00 p.m.

Lethbridge: (St. Theresa the Little Flower) 

Fr. Jenkins online instructions: wcbohio.blogspot.com.
6 Day Votive Light Candles: The price per candle is $2.50 each, $62 per case.
Live stream sermons: you can now watch one of the SSPV or CSPV priests offer Mass in Boynton Beach, Florida. It is live streamed every Sunday at 500pm (eastern) and then archived. The address for this is http://tiny.cc/ourladyofpeace
SSPV Sermons may be heard on You Tube channel wcbohio
Sanctuary Lamp: If you would like to have the Sanctuary Lamp burning for the repose of soul, anniversary or remembrances, and who requests it, the usual donation is $10. Fill out a request an return to Fr. Skierka
Fr. Jenkins online instructions: http://www.wcbohio.com/
Please Keep in your prayers: The deceased, ill and the injured and those that are in special need of prayers, particularly of our parish.

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CATHOLIC EDUCATION IN THE HOME
(A talk given to the 1954 South Australian State Conference of the National Catholic Rural Movement, by a Dominican Nun, Cabra Convent, Adelaide).

Good manners is the outward showing of courtesy and good-mannered children have good-mannered parents – That is the only certain way. This is true also of modesty– person's sense of reverence for himself, his own person. Here, the father has a tremen-ous responsibility for the modest manliness of his sons and their respect for women; and the mother must know that her girl's womanly modesty and purity depend large-ly on hers. A girl nowadays, needs this virtue to an heroic degree, so great are the temptations to unbecoming dress and beha-vior. Yet Catholic women, who knew how to dress smartly and modestly, and had the courage of their convictions, could start a revolution in this matter.

THE HOME OF A SAINT
To end my talk, I want to quote the words of Pope Pius XII, spoken when he was canonizing St. Maria Goretti, the twelve year-old martyr of purity – She was, he said, the fruit of a Christian home with its old simple method of education, a home where one prays, where the children are brought up in fear of God, in obedience to parents, in the love of truth and self-respect, accustomed to be satisfied with little, and to give a helping hand.
It was a country home, and Maria was a country child, who learnt early the meaning of sharing fully in the joys and sufferings of a family – the give and take of a family life. I have always loved the ideals of country life, and have loved teaching children from country homes. That is why I am glad and honored to speak to you today, to get to know a little of those who make it possible for children to be truly childlike. City child-ren have their own lovableness and perhaps a greater need of our work, but I often find myself longing to give them the tremendous benefits of growing up in the country – and that is why I think every effort should be made to establish in the country, colleges and schools that are fully Catholic and truly rural in ideals.
Our Lady was the mistress of a little village home in Nazareth; Jesus was a little village child. I know their loving spirit will guide every step the country child takes on his way to heaven.

 

A Good Confession
What we usually refer to as “going to confession”actually means receiving a sacrament: the sacrament of Penance. The catechism states that Penance is “the sacra-ment by which sins committed after Baptism are forgiven.” These two sacraments — ordinarily the first two sacraments we re-ceive in life — are called Sacraments of the Dead. Although this designation might sound a bit morbid, in fact it refers to the life-giving powers of these two sacraments in restoring supernatural life to a soul in the state of mortal sin, the condition of spiritual death. In that sense they are the sacraments of spiritual resurrection for the soul. It is as though the soul rises from the dead when the head is lifted from the baptismal font; it is as though the soul emerges from the tomb after confession.

Our Lord Jesus Christ has told us that if we wish to enter into the Kingdom of Heaven, we must humble ourselves as little children. That humbling is nowhere more evident than in the simple, straightforward confession and apology for sins in the sacrament of Penance.

Can all sins be forgiven? Yes, all sins for which we can be genuinely sorry, i.e., for which we can have true, at least imperfect,
contrition. Why then does Our Lord speak of sins against the Holy Ghost which will not be forgiven, neither in this world nor in the next? Christ refers to sins of despair and presumption as sins against the Holy Ghost. Despair rejects God’s mercy; presumption rejects God’s justice. Both sins have the effect that we will not repent of our sins, and thus we reject forgiveness.

The most important accomplishment of each day of our lives is to live, i.e., to be in the state of sanctifying grace. The most important accomplishment of Advent is to make a sincere, humble and complete confession of our sins with true contrition and to receive absolution in the Sacrament of Penance.

 

 

 

 

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1. The question is, what exactly does it mean, to dress modestly?
2. What does the Catholic Church say on the matter?

On January 12, 1930, the sacred Congregation of the Council, by mandate of Pope Pius XI, has issued emphatic instructions on modesty of dress to all bishops, directing them to insist on these prescriptions:
"We recall that a dress cannot be called decent which is cut deeper than two fingers breadth under the pit of the throat, which does not cover the arms at least to the elbows, and scarcely reaches a bit beyond the knee. Furthermore, dresses of transparent material are improper.

Women must be decently dressed, especially when they go to church. The parish priest may, with due prudence, refuse them entrance to the church and access to the reception of the Sacraments, [each] and every time that they come to church immodestly dressed." (General Pastoral Directive, 1915 A.D.)

"Girls and women dressed immodestly are to be debarred from Holy Communion and from acting as sponsors at the Sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation; further, if the offense be extreme, they may even be forbidden to enter the church." [Decree of the Congregation of the Council, 1930 A.D.]