Weekly Mass Schedule


SUNDAY: January 19th - 2nd Sunday after Epiphany (sd)
Missa Pro Populo........................................................................................ 9:00 a.m. Mass
MONDAY: January 20th - Sts. Fabian, P & Sebastian, Mm (d)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry....................................................... No Mass
TUESDAY: January 21st - St. Agnes, VM (d)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry....................................................... No Mass
WEDNESDAY: January 22nd - Sts. Vincent & Anastasius, Mm (sd)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry....................................................... No Mass
THURSDAY: January 23rd - St. Raymund of Pennafort, C (sd)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry....................................................... 8:00 a.m. Mass
FRIDAY: January 24th - St. Timothy, BpM (d)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry....................................................... 8:00 a.m. Mass
SATURDAY: January 25th - The Conversion of St. Paul, Ap (dm)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry....................................................... 9:00 a.m. Mass
SUNDAY: January 26th - 3rd Sunday after Epiphany (sd
Missa Pro Populo........................................................................................ 9:00 a.m. Mass

Sanctuary Lamp burning for the repose of the soul of Bishop Alfred Mendez.

Confession Schedule
Saturday — 8:30 a.m. - 8:55 a.m.
Sunday — 8:00 a.m. - 8:55 a.m.

Church Cleaning Schedule
Jan 1 9— Amy Lightner, Rachel Lightner, Josie Lightner
Jan 26 — Penny Shevlin
Feb 2 — Rita Bogner & Barbara Kalafat

Treat Schedule
Jan 19 —Ruth Evens, Chandee Bomgardner and Justina Merja
Jan 26 — Laura Lightner, Bernadette Dube
Feb 2 — Sarah Rollins, Hannah Lowder

Altar Boy Serving Schedule
Jan 19 —Stephen Rollins & William Lightner
Jan 26 —Oran Skierka & Blane Lightner
Feb 2 —— MC - Oran Skierka Th - Nathan Rollins CB -Stephen Rollins
Ac - Killian Skierka & Kernan Skierka
TB - Brennan Skierka, Gabriel Lightner, Dominic Skierka
TB - William Lightner, Quentin Skierka, Louis Lightner

Snow Removal
Jan 19 — Scott Drewes — Josh Bradshaw
Jan 26 — Kevin Rollins — Brenden Rollins
Feb 2 — Max Kern, Alex Kern, and Ken Kern

                                                                               Announcements


There will be a baby shower honoring Josie Lightner right after Mass in the apartment upstairs. All the women of the parish are welcome. For more information contact Jacquelyn or Justina Merja.

6 Day Votive Light Candles: The price per candle is $2.50 each, $60 per case.

Live stream sermons: you can now watch one of the SSPV or CSPV priests offer Mass in Boynton Beach, Florida. It is live streamed every Sunday at 500pm (eastern) and then archived. The address for this is http://tiny.cc/ourladyofpeace
SSPV Sermons may now be heard on You Tube channel wcbohio
Sanctuary Lamp: If you would like to have the Sanctuary Lamp burning for the repose of soul, anniversary or remembrances, and who requests it, the usual donation is $10. Fill out a request an return to Fr. Skierka
Fr. Jenkins online instructions: http://www.wcbohio.com/
Please Keep in your prayers: The deceased, ill and the injured and those that are in special need of prayers, particularly of our parish.
Blessing of Religious Articles: Following Mass next Sunday.
What Catholics Believe:"wbcohio" – http://www.wcbohio.com/ – Father Jenkins comments on some of the recent events of the SSPX, Fr. Davide Pagliarani; Fr. Patrick Girouard’s sermon on the SSPX’s re-branding, and other timely topics;..

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MONEY RUNS or RUINS the HOME
by Daniel A. Lord, S.J.

Sometimes God inspires men to use it beautifully, as when the jeweler forms it into a chalice or a monstrance, or when Fra Angelico painted with it a glorious scene of the courts of heaven. Symbolic-ally gold can be lovely, as when the young man places upon the finger of his beloved the ring that symbolizes eternal love, or the young nun looks down at the ring she wears and knows herself the bride of Christ. Gold has today a few physical and chemical uses in industry. And if tomor-row humanity had to choose between gold and silver on the one hand and iron, copper, lead, tin, and radium on the other, no sensible man would hesitate in his choice of the latter group of metals.
So in itself money is pretty well character-ized by the paper, barren gold, and chilly silver that we carry about in our purses.
Its Use
Yet we can’t talk about money in the home without pausing for a second to realize what money means in our modern civilization.
We call it — and rightly — a medium of exchange. It is something we can trade for those really important things which we place on our tables, build into our houses, hang about our bodies, put onto the shelves of our libraries, use for our comfort and joy.
The youngster soon learns the meaning of money. He carries to the corner store the pennies granddad has given him and exchanges them for lollipops and “jaw-breakers.” Or on other less romantic occasions, he trudges off to exchange them for yeast for mother, stamps for granddad, tobacco for father, a loaf of bread for the family, a box of face powder for sister. Later on his financial operations will be different in quantity but not in quality: He will exchange twenty dollars for a summer suit, ten thousand dollars for a house, a cool hundred million for a railroad, a billion for the oil fields in some newly explored jungle.

Money is Power
In that power of exchange lies the whole meaning of money.
Money is power. Money makes possible the Thanks-giving dinner, the child’s edu-cation, a summer vacation, the city water works, the employing of a staff of assis-tants, a bag of potato chips or the contents of a jeweler’s case, the training necessary to become a doctor, a bed in the hospital, a lovely picture for the wall, the grati-fication of some hobby like stamp collect-ing, photography, or Ming pottery.
A few men in history have been misers. They are such queer specimens of human nature that they are overplayed and over-stressed in literature. Rarely do we actually meet the kind of man who sits in a damp basement and runs gold coins through his fingers or counts the thousand-dollar bills that he has patiently accumu-lated and never uses.
Even when people these days are stingy and mean about money, you’ll find that they have some extravagant idea in the back of their heads. Someday they mean to make a trip around the world, and they are saving for that day. Some-time they mean to quit work altogether and live off their incomes. That day or time may never come, but they have learned long ago the Midas lesson that you can’t eat, drink, love, sleep on, or hold to your heart the soulless thing that is money.
Who Controls Money
So in dealing with money, we are dealing with power. When we as members of the family share money with others, we are sharing power. When we are mean and stingy, we cut away others’ power to do things. The youngster with no money in his pocket can wistfully look through the candy shop window all day long — for all the good it does him. And the old man sitting in the shade of the veranda digs his old fist into his empty pocket and knows how powerless he is.
For a long, long time now we have accepted the political principle that the hands which control the money of the nation control the nation. Once upon a time the king took what money he wanted and spent it as his whims dictated.

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1. The question is, what exactly does it mean, to dress modestly?
2. What does the Catholic Church say on the matter?

On January 12, 1930, the sacred Congregation of the Council, by mandate of Pope Pius XI, has issued emphatic instructions on modesty of dress to all bishops, directing them to insist on these prescriptions:
"We recall that a dress cannot be called decent which is cut deeper than two fingers breadth under the pit of the throat, which does not cover the arms at least to the elbows, and scarcely reaches a bit beyond the knee. Furthermore, dresses of transparent material are improper.

Women must be decently dressed, especially when they go to church. The parish priest may, with due prudence, refuse them entrance to the church and access to the reception of the Sacraments, [each] and every time that they come to church immodestly dressed." (General Pastoral Directive, 1915 A.D.)

"Girls and women dressed immodestly are to be debarred from Holy Communion and from acting as sponsors at the Sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation; further, if the offense be extreme, they may even be forbidden to enter the church." [Decree of the Congregation of the Council, 1930 A.D.]